Reader’s Forum —Cynthia Carpathios

An American Sickness: The Commodification of Americans

“Unless you’re part of the 1 percent, you’re only ever one unlucky step away from medical financial disaster.”

Although most of us are aware that the healthcare system in America is not well, we may not have realized the extent of the illness.  If you are fortunate enough to have a job with decent insurance, you may not realize how vulnerable you really are.

Elisabeth Rosenthal’s book, An American Sickness: How Healthcare Become Big Business and How You Can Take It Back, is a History and Physical of American Healthcare.  It is compelling, sometimes funny, and absolutely appalling.

The Chief Complaint is “hugely expensive medical care that doesn’t deliver quality results.”  Rosenthal then lays out the History of the Present Illness and Review of Systems, a look at how American medicine has transformed from one based on caring to one based on profit. And in the Diagnosis and Treatment, she gives us resources for ourselves and for the broader good, what we can do to be less vulnerable to outrageous doctor bills, hospital bills, insurance costs and what kinds of systemic changes we need to demand from our lawmakers, insurance companies, providers and healthcare institutions, hospital and insurance regulators.

What is so shocking is how vulnerable we all are, even those of us with the best insurance.  All we need is a hospitalization or emergency situation in which, without choice or informed consent, we receive service from out-of-network providers or end up in an out-of-network facility and we can be on the line for astronomical charges.  The provider may just say hello to you at your bedside in the hospital. You may be taken to the nearest facility when you are in a situation where every minute counts, and you may not even be conscious. And the rest of your life you may be in financial ruin.

Increasingly certain groups of providers and certain facilities don’t sign up in networks at all and charge whatever they want.

And this is only one outrageous way to go deeply into debt to our broken medical system.

The breakdown in relationship between the medical industry and the people they serve is one that touches all of us, and I feel particularly close to it. My father was a thoracic surgeon in the “golden age” of medicine.  He accepted what people could pay. We had several beautiful oil paintings from one of his patients. One of my brothers is a physician employed by a large medical conglomerate, who has considered repeatedly whether he can bear to stay in medicine. The differences between my father’s and my brother’s experience of the medical field are enormous.

I work in a hospital, a community hospital that has recently been acquired by a larger medical entity. I do payroll and accounting for the physician practices that are under the hospital’s wing.  I see the bankruptcy paperwork coming in for patients who have gone underwater. I see what we pay for consultants, for drugs, the closing of departments that don’t bring in enough money (we no longer deliver babies at this hospital) and the struggle our little hospital has had to stay open. I see the doctors who experience that despite their big paychecks, they are stressed and unhappy, many of them feeling like drivers being pushed to go ever faster and do more in a system whose focus is on the mighty dollar.

It is riveting and distressing to read Rosenthal’s history of the moves that have been made that have been part of creating the current state of affairs where patients are no longer related to on a human level – where they have become a commodity, a dollar figure.

The medical industry is not alone in this regard.  We have seen similar breakdowns in higher education, in banking and investor relations, in the relationship of employers to their workers, in government and its representatives to the people they are mandated to represent.  Things have never been perfect, there have always been ways in which certain groups have been more privileged; this is embedded in our country’s history. But what we are now seeing is a wholesale breakdown of the relationship between the service industries and the people they are purporting to serve.

What we are seeing is something that can’t just be changed by laws or more regulation.  The creativity of those at the top of the money-making pile to work around issues is enormous.  Yes, those changes are needed, and we need to support them. And we need cultural/social/human development at the same time, without which anything else will never be fully successful.  

Despite the infuriating advantage being taken by those who have the power and money to do so, they are also victims of this system.  Their humanity has been eroded and their growth as human beings stunted. We need to support functional changes where we can do so and we need to bring growth and development into our lives and those around us, transforming the systems that underlie our medical system, our society, our economy, our political system, our country from the inside out. 

Cynthia Carpathios is a long-time political independent and a novice Buddhist monk.  She lives in Alliance, Ohio.

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Rick Robol and Cynthia Carpathios of Independent Ohio

*Reminder*

Conference Call with Elisabeth Rosenthal

Author of American Sickness

Sunday, December 2nd at 7 pm EST

Call: 641-715-3605
Pass code: 767775#

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Elisabeth Rosenthal at Politics and Prose (video)

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Elisabeth Rosenthal discusses her debut book about the American health care system


In her first book, Rosenthal, editor in chief of Kaiser Health News as well as an M.D., takes a comprehensive look at the country’s ailing health care system. By breaking down the whole into its parts, she guides readers through a complicated tangle of hospitals, doctors, insurance companies, and drug manufacturers, focusing especially on the problems that have arisen in recent years as more hospitals are run by business executives and more research charities enter into profitable relationships with drug companies. Rosenthal shows how these arrangements harm patients and suggests ways we can heal the system.

Founded by Carla Cohen and Barbara Meade in 1984, Politics and Prose Bookstore is Washington, D.C.’s premier independent bookstore and cultural hub, a gathering place for people interested in reading and discussing books. Politics and Prose offers superior service, unusual book choices, and a haven for book lovers in the store and online.

Visit them on the web at http://www.politics-prose.com/

Produced by Tom Warren

An American Sickness Book Cover (1)

*Reminder*

Conference Call with Elisabeth Rosenthal

Author of American Sickness

Sunday, December 2nd at 7 pm EST

Call: 641-715-3605
Pass code: 767775#

Reader’s Forum – Frank Fear, Sr. and Frank Fear, Jr.

Rosenthal Demystifies America’s Health Care System and How to Fix It

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Frank Fear, Jr. and Frank Fear, Sr.

When beating cancer costs $17,000 a month, what do you do?read the newspaper headline. “1,495 Americans describe the financial reality of being really sick” reads another.  It’s no wonder that health care weighs heavily on the minds of America’s voters as they head to the mid-term polls.

That’s no surprise to Frank Fear, Jr., former vice president of a community hospital and current chief information officer at a regional health system. It’s no surprise to his father, Frank Fear, Sr., a cancer survivor.

Cancer had an indelible impact on Fear Sr.—and not just because of the disease. It was also because of the cost, which totaled tens of thousands of dollars. Fear’s cost-share was manageable. He had employer-sponsored health/medical insurance.

Fear, Sr. was fortunate. Many are not. That’s a problem. It’s America’s problem.

And it’s why Elisabeth Rosenthal’s An American Sickness is such an important book. A physician and journalist, Rosenthal shares her grounded perspective understandably and persuasively. “In the past quarter century,” she begins, “the American medical system has stopped focusing on health or even science. Instead, it attends more or less single-mindedly to its own profits.” (p. 1)

Profit-making isn’t a new story and it’s not even a bad story, either—at least on its face. It becomes a problem when for-the-public-good operations get out of balance, focusing too much on money and not enough on public obligations.

To make that point, Rosenthal analyzes the system’s components—insurance, hospitals, physicians, pharmaceuticals, testing services, medical devices, billing, and general management. The centerpiece of her critique is what she labels, “Economic Rules for the Dysfunctional Medical Market” (p. 8).

If you read nothing else from this book, read that material! The reason? Rosenthal pinpoints what needs to change, things like: More treatment is always better. Treatment is preferable to a cure. There’s no such thing as a ‘fixed price.’

Rosenthal doesn’t believe our current plight is caused by bad people doing bad things. Indeed, she recounts story after story of people and organizations doing good things. They share a common characteristic, though: swimming against the tide trying (as hokey as it may sound) to do the right thing.

What’s the answer? Rosenthal’s answer is clear: “return the system to affordable, evidence-based, patient-centered care” (p. 328). For that to happen, she says, “we need to…become bolder, more active and thoughtful about what we demand in health care and the people who deliver it. We must be more engaged in finding and pressing the political levers to promote the evolution of the medical care we deserve” (p. 329).

The “we” to which Rosenthal refers is us— everyday citizens. She’s right, but there’s a hitch, and a big one, too. Rosenthal’s advice applies to other areas in need of public reform (the cost of public higher education, for example), which require citizens to roll up their sleeves, be bold and knowledgeable, and get the political system to work as it should.

In all of those situations, resolution also requires ‘smarts,’ including the ability to figure out solutions that don’t generate a new set of problems. That’s especially important when change-seekers want BIG change (as they do in health care) by replacing existing systems with entirely new ones. (For Rosenthal’s critique of the single-payer model, go here).

That’s why the option we prefer involves fixing the system that exists in America today—the market-based system. That system isn’t the problem. The problem is that it’s not patient-centered.

What would it take to make that happen? First, the system needs to operate the way that other (and perfectly sensible) customer-driven systems work. And, second, the system needs to be wellness- not illness-focused.

Fixing the first problem means making costs more transparent and for health vendors/providers to be more accountable. Rosenthal gives plenty of examples of how to do both, including providing patients with upfront figures regarding the full costs of medicines, tests, and medical interventions—even enabling patients to price-compare. Doing that just makes common sense.

The second matter involves changing the mindset that drives the system, including the way that many of us think about health, doctors, and hospitals. Rosenthal gives examples of how organizations, states, and the Federal government have incentivized the health system to keep people healthy vs. paying them to treat patients when they’re sick. Examples include the Boeing Company (p. 289) and the State of Maryland (p. 298). Another example is Medicare Advantage.

What’s it all mean? The clock is ticking, just as it is with other critical issues facing America (e.g. climate change). In the meantime, too many people are being hurt as we stumble around trying to figure out how to improve the system.

At issue is figuring out what change is workable (politically and economically) and how to make change a reality. It’s with those objectives in mind that Elisabeth Rosenthal gives America a get well card—how to figure out both.

Frank Fear, Jr. is Chief Information Officer at Covenant Healthcare (Saginaw, MI), a non-profit health care system that serves twenty counties in central and northeast Michigan. Frank served previously as vice president at Memorial Healthcare (Owosso, MI), a non-profit hospital offering inpatient and outpatient services to those living in its 100,000-person service area. He received a B.A. in psychology from Albion College and graduated from Michigan State University with an M.A. in counseling psychology.

Frank A. Fear, Sr. is professor emeritus, Michigan State University, where he served as a faculty member and worked in a variety of administrative positions. He is primarily interested in how public and nonprofit institutions serve the public good. Frank currently works as Managing Editor/columnist at The Sports Column (Baltimore, MD) and writes regularly about social issues for the Los Angeles-based, LA Progressive

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Politics for the People

Conference Call

An American Sickness

With Author Elisabeth Rosenthal

Sunday, Dec. 2nd at 7 pm EST.

Call in number:  641-715-3605 

Passcode 767775#

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Lois Leveen on Writing Historical Fiction

Give a listen to Lois Leveen’s 2013 interview on Live Wire Radio for a great discussion of the perils of writing historical fiction (she reads her article, “Fear of a Red Tractor” on the show and it is posted below); Mary Bowser; and the Civil War.

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PowellsBooks.Blog 
Authors, readers, critics, media − and booksellers.

Fear of a Red Tractor

Fear of a red tractor. That is what keeps a novelist up at night.

Remember the good ol’ days when barber, surgeon, and dentist was a single occupation?Secrets of Mary Bowser Bk Cover

Okay, maybe those days weren’t so good. But at least back then, the dentist was probably too busy to be a literary critic, too. My dentist, however, is another matter.

Last year, while giving my molars the once over, the dear old DMD told me about a book he’d been reading. A book he really liked. Until he got to a description of “a red John Deere tractor” sitting in a field. He immediately put the book down, never to finish it. Because, as he put it, “everyone knows, John Deere has never made a red tractor. That was put in there by some New York editor.”

Tractor

Only a West Coast dentist can make a New York editor sound like such an unseemly villain.

Authors — and our editors — are always trying to add specificity to our descriptions, to make things more real. Except that when you get that “real” detail wrong, you have blown it big time.

As it happens, one of my New York editors is originally from Virginia, where much of my novel is set. She suggested that the bird’s nest I’d tucked into a magnolia tree on the very first page of my novel should have gone into a dogwood, because that’s the state tree of Virginia — it would sound more specific, less generically Southern.

As it also happens, I’m an obsessed lunatic. I’d already checked on whether magnolias grew in Richmond. But here was a bona fide Virginian making the case for dogwood. So what did I do? I emailed one of the Virginia state arborists, just to make sure that a bird would actually nest in a dogwood if it were in the exact location of the tree on page one of my novel. Only when he said yes did I make the change.

As you can imagine, this level of obsession takes an awful lot out of a novelist. I was reading the galleys of my book last fall, and lo and behold, I realized I’d made a reference to a straight razor.

You know, the olde timey open-bladed razor that any 19th-century character would be familiar with. And so I took my purple pencil (the red pen of galley proofing) and crossed it out.

Why?

Because nobody called a straight razor a straight razor, until after there were safety razors (that olde timey kind everyone’s dad used, before disposables came along). Until then, they were just razors.

who you calling

In writing a novel based on a real person, I focused on crafting a compelling story. Which means sometimes I intentionally deviated from what I knew to be true. I’ve also unearthed new facts about Mary Bowser since drafting the novel (I told you I’m an obsessed lunatic — of course I’m still researching), which means those details aren’t in the book. Sometimes when I was writing, I made something up that I later learned was true, or close to the truth, which gives me goosebumps.

Still, I’m sure there are things I got wrong without realizing, in those devilish details. So if you happen upon a big ol’ red John Deere in the field of my fiction, please forgive me. And don’t tell my dentist.

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Our Politics for the People Conference Call 

Will Explore

The Secrets of Mary Bowser

With Author Lois Leveen

Secrets of Mary Bowser Bk Cover

Sunday, June 3rd at 7 pm EST.

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Reader’s Forum–Tiani Coleman

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Greg Orman, who almost unseated a deeply entrenched incumbent as an independent candidate for U.S. Senate in 2014, and who is now a promising independent candidate for Governor in Kansas, shares some vital insights in his book, A Declaration of Independents:  How We Can Break the Two-Party Stranglehold and Restore the American Dream.  Not only does Orman informatively expose details about the crushing control the two-party Duopoly holds on American politics, but he does so with unique credentials, and with a vision for how we can return power to “we the people.”

As a previous Republican-party insider in Utah, a state where Republicans dominate, I can relate to Orman’s description of politics in Kansas, also a heavily Republican state.  Orman mentions how partisan-controlled politics has forced candidates to take the most extreme views and duke out their chief battles in party primaries (since the general election outcome is usually a forgone conclusion).  I found the following observation by Orman to be particularly revealing and important:

“[I]n our current crisis, moderates are partly the authors of their own misfortune.  I’ve long held the view that moderates in both parties are the victims of the rule rigging and negative campaigning that they themselves have historically supported.  They made the assumption that if it was good for the party, it was good for them as incumbent officeholders. . . .  [They] helped to create an environment that was ironically hostile to them.”  (p. 106)

By definition, “moderates” are supposed to be more reasonable, more rational, less ideologically partisan, more mainstream – thus, less extreme.  They’re supposed to be the types of people who are able to find common ground with the other side.  However, the “moderates” failed America.  They lacked the political courage to “do the right thing.”  They became the entrenched establishment that was ever too happy to rig the rules in their favor, ever too comfortable engaging in cronyism, ever too eager to use their position for permanent career advancement, ever too entitled to not create a permanent class of elites that shut out most of America.

But, “the party people,” rather than blaming lack of ethics (abuse of power), have blamed moderates’ willingness to compromise on complicated issues; they’ve cynically denounced independent rationality itself.  Things have now become so highly polarized and partisan that “moderate” is a bad word for parties, and “moderates” are facing extinction in our party-controlled government.  The saddest part in all of this is that Book Imagedespite moderates’ concerns about the current state of things, very few have stepped forward and admitted their folly; they’re not actively working to right the ship they’re responsible for damaging.  As they lose re-election, they blame the extremists – and then they settle into a lucrative lobbying job.  They certainly can’t fathom working to reform a broken system – that would be too radical.  And nearly none of them will risk reputation and loss of money prospects to run as independents and/or publicly support independent candidates.

So major kudos to Greg Orman, someone who has been willing to put everything on the line and be a real leader.  He understands why our government isn’t working, and he’s willing to do what it takes – despite the naysayers who might call him “a spoiler, dishonest, or just plain crazy.”  Orman understands that the only way to fix things is for competent people of conviction who don’t see everything through a partisan lens, to step up – outside the current partisan system – and offer their independent minds and spirits at the solution table; after all, regardless of which side in our duopoly wins, “[w]e haven’t seen any fundamental changes in the [negative] long-term direction of our country.”  (p. 274).

I was struck by Orman’s example coming from research by the Bipartisan Policy Center, wherein on education reform proposals, “Democrats preferred ‘their party’s’ plan 75 percent to 17 percent.  Yet when the exact same details were called the ‘Republican Plan,’ only 12 percent of Democrats liked it.  The same dichotomy was present among Republicans.  Only independents answered the question irrespective of which party label was put on it.”  (p. 144)  Orman gets it:  “policy positions [are] not driving partisanship, but rather partisanship [is] driving policy positions.”

With attitudes such as George Will’s indicating that it’s less important to upgrade the “intellectual voltage” in the Senate than it is to get one more Republican elected (or Democrat, depending on who is speaking), we know we’ve lost any semblance of putting country first, but are simply trying to help our team win at any cost.  I’m heartened by Orman’s common sense approach of working to understand all points of view around an issue, and looking objectively and creatively to find solutions, embracing diversity of thought and intellectual conflict “as a way to get to the right answer,” calling upon all of us to be willing to change our minds as new information informs us that our prior position was incorrect.  This is what it means to be independent of partisan boxes and think for ourselves.

Orman points out that we would never allow our sports teams to shamelessly rig the rules of competition such that the same two teams always make it to the World Series, and yet we have allowed Republicans and Democrats to do this in U.S. politics.  It’s time for Americans of good faith everywhere to “cast off the heavy collar of partisanship,” (p. 255) be willing to take bold risks for our country – not only when we have nothing to lose, but especially when we have “everything” to lose – and create a better America for future generations.

Tiani Xochitl Coleman is a mother of five, a graduate of Cornell Law School, and president of NH Independent Voters.

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POLITICS for the PEOPLE 

CONFERENCE CALL with Author GREG ORMAN

A Declaration of Independents

How We Can Break the Two-Party Stranglehold and Restore the American Dream

SUNDAY, APRIL 15th @ 7 PM EST

641-715-3605 and passcode 767775#

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Readers’ Forum—Natesha Oliver

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Natesha Oliver with Independent Voting President, Jackie Salit.  Kansas City, MO 2017

 

Reading A Declaration of Independents by Greg Orman hit me in several ways. I laughed at the absurdity of an elected official, a sitting elected official, living in a totally different state than the one he is charged to represent. Then I cried, for the same reason and for the fact that he actually won reelection.

That is profoundly sad to me.

It’s like are Americans that far removed from caring about the people they send to office and their “ability” to RELATE to their, the American People, concerns, especially community concerns.

I mean at this point it seems like the only reason parties succeed is through the detachment of its constituency to even the most basic values for good representation, being part of the “community” even if “community” encompasses the entire state.

Then I cried for myself, when the book pointed out the reality that most of the people born in the bottom 20 percent will more than likely die there.

Talk about scary AND depressing. Because I was born in the bottom 20 percent and has had no success in getting out and trust I have and am striving to in more ways than is necessary to say.

To know that partisan politics really does play a role in that reality is angering yet I say again is it the parties or the detachment of the American People?!

Greg’s telling of the conditions that “governs” our Government is eye-opening in some respects because I am still young enough to not know when government was actually functioning and mind-boggling because REALLY??? Our Government has truly lost a lot of the values that was subtly instilled in my beliefs of “do the right thing and all will work out”. That is simply untrue and that is simply the hardest pill to swallow.

Yet!!!

Greg Orman does leave me with a smidget of hope.  Even if it is from his own determination to fix the duopolistic nature of our governing body.

His call to Independents to run for office and for Americans to consider the Independent path in politics is very sound. He has mapped out a way for Americans to regain some form of power back in such an overtly disregardful and corrupt political environment.

Will his call and the call of other Independent activists be answered?

Time will tell.

Natesha Oliver is the founder and President of Missouri Independents Stand Together (M.I.S.T.). She lives in Kansas City, MO.

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POLITICS for the PEOPLE BOOK CLUB

CONFERENCE CALL with Author GREG ORMAN

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SUNDAY, APRIL 15th @ 7 PM EST

641-715-3605 and passcode 767775#

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P4P launches monthly IVN column

Last week I launched a monthly column on IVN, a nonpartisan on line news outlet that provides thoughtful political news and policy analysis. It is my go to read every day for national news on the independent and reform movements.  I am very pleased to bring Politics for the People to IVN readers.  Hope you enjoy my opening column.

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Politics for the People:

A Book Club for the Curious Independent

 

by Cathy Stewart in Campaigns Mar 8, 2018

 Book clubs have been a part of American life since 1634 when Anne Hutchinson started a “literary circle” for women as they crossed the Atlantic en route to the colonies. In 1840, Margaret Fuller founded the first book club sponsored by a book store, and by the mid 1800’s book clubs began to spread across the Midwest.

Today, estimates are that 5 million Americans participate in book clubs.

In 2011, I established the Politics for the People (P4P) Book Club for independents. The book club was an extension of a popular education series that I ran for the New York City Independence Clubs. I wanted to provide a national forum for independents to build a community of curiosity that was exploring politics and history together from a nonpartisan, independent point of view.

A book club seemed the perfect fit.

The Politics for the People Book Club has a unique approach. We’ve created a forum for club members to engage with world-class authors about critical issues and moments in the American experiment at a time when civic discourse is corroded by both partisanship and superficiality.

We read each of our selections over six to eight weeks. Our reading is echoed in an interactive blog that includes videos, literary reviews, background materials and, most importantly, the thoughts, reflections, and commentary from our members.

The P4P blog becomes a crossroads that adds depth to our reading experience and creates a sense of community among our members. And just as we read our authors’ words, they read the words of independent Americans responding to their work.

I wanted to provide a national forum for independents to build a community of curiosity that was exploring politics and history together from a nonpartisan, independent point of view.

Cathy Stewart, Vice President for National Development at Independent Voting

Each selection culminates in a conference call with our author where we explore the book and create a conversation through questions from our members. Authors and book club members alike find the conference calls stimulating and thought-provoking.

Alex Myers, the author of Revolutionary (a historical novel about Deborah Sampson who pretended to be a man to serve in the Revolutionary army) had this to say about our conference call and P4P members, “These were people who had read and thought about my novel on levels far beyond plot and character. It felt like the kind of conversation we need to have as a country.”

Politics for the People authors find the discussions unusual both in the depth of the dialogue and in the diversity of the participants. They often tell me that we ask questions that they have never been asked before and they thank me for the P4P experience.

These were people who had read and thought about my novel on levels far beyond plot and character. It felt like the kind of conversation we need to have as a country.

Alex Myers, author of Revolutionary

Our members (now over 335) are as diverse as the independent movement, from all walks of life, and from all racial, ethnic and economic backgrounds. P4P members range from avid readers to people who never picked up a book before joining the club. For many of our readers, P4P has introduced them to new genres and insights into history, and current events.

We have created a P4P community that is welcoming of a wide range of views, that is fun, and that supports everyone to read, grow and learn together. Tiani Coleman, the President of New Hampshire Independent Voters has said the book club “motivates me to read, contemplate and write about thought-provoking books that I likely wouldn’t find time for otherwise, helping me grow as a person and as a leader in the independent movement.”

Our selections include fiction, poetry, and non-fiction. We have had several Pulitzer Prize winning authors join us for intimate conversations about their work, including Isabel Wilkerson (The Warmth of Other Suns); Eric Foner (Gateway to Freedom: The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad); Matthew Desmond (Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City)Hedrick Smith (Who Stole the American Dream? Can We Get It Back?) and Megan Marshall (Margaret Fuller: A New American Life).

Historical fiction selections like Jerome Charyn’s I Am Abraham: A Novel of Lincoln and the Civil War and Alex Meyers’ Revolutionary give us a portal to experience and imagine the lives, the challenges and the circumstances of the people–both ordinary and extraordinary–who are the movers of history. P4P is an opportunity to question the notion that there is one truth or a single view of history.

How do I pick selections for Politics for the People? A mixture of recommendations, serendipity, and scouting. I look for selections that challenge conventional ways of thinking, and are written by authors we would enjoy talking with. Perhaps, most importantly, I am always reading…

I will be sharing P4P selections and reviews of other books of interest to independent-minded Americans in the months to come. If you have a book you would like to recommend for P4P, please send me a note.  And please join me in the Politics for the People book club!  Visit the blog and sign up to join our book reading, conversation creating independent community.

Happy Reading.

Cathy Stewart
Cathy L. Stewart has been a political activist in the independent movement since the mid-1980’s. She is the Vice President for National Development at Independent Voting and the founder and host of Politics for the People.

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POLITICS for the PEOPLE BOOK CLUB

CURRENT SELECTION:

A Declaration of Independents

How We Can Break the Two-Party Stranglehold and Restore the American Dream

CONFERENCE CALL with Author GREG ORMAN

SUNDAY, APRIL 15th @ 7 PM EST

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New Selection—A Declaration of Independents by Greg Orman

 

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I am delighted to announce our first selection of 2018.  A Declaration of Independents  by Greg Orman was released in 2016.

In 2014, Greg Orman–a successful business leader and entrepreneur–ran for U.S. Senate in Kansas as an independent.  His landmark campaign attracted national attention as he nearly beat incumbent Republican Senator Pat Roberts.  The Democrat in the race dropped out, recognizing that Greg had animated record numbers of voters and was in the best position. The race was very close until the very final days.

The book chronicles Greg’s journey to becoming an independent and his experiences in this historic campaign.

In Declaration of Independents, Greg describes the huge price we are paying as a result of the toxic partisan political culture in Washington. Greg spells out how that two-party machine works, the supporting institutions that reinforce the paradigm limiting both competition and accountability to voters. In the final section of the book, Greg lays out his vision for reinventing our political system.

In his Acknowledgements, Greg writes that he had been “…writing this book in my head for over fifteen years….” He goes on to share the impact of his campaign on the book, “What would have been missing [had the book been written before the campaign] is the perspective that comes from having run for office in Kansas and being able to talk to my fellow citizens about issues that matter to the.  Without our campaign, there would be no book. Running for the U.S. Senate was genuinely the honor of a lifetime.”

ORman announcement photo from IVN

AP Photo

In January, Greg announced his independent candidacy for Governor of Kansas.  In an interview with Tim Carpenter from the Topeka Capital -Journal, Greg shared how he thinks about being an independent:

For me being politically independent is not about ideology. It’s about 3 things:

  • it’s about putting my state and my country ahead of a political party.
  • it’s about using facts and common sense to solve problems, not just clinging to rigid ideological solutions even when they are not working.
  • and importantly, it’s about being free from obligations to party bosses and special interests.”

Later in the interview Greg shared his view of state government, “At the end of the day we’ve had a government in Topeka that has been very resistant to the involvement of its citizens. And you’ll see when we come out with our transparency plan that we plan to open up the statehouse to the citizens of Kansas. We view them as equal partners in the problem solving process and we’re going to involve them.”

IVN has been regularly covering the campaign. In his latest article about Greg’s campaign launch, Shawn Griffiths writes,

The two parties will do all they can to make this about them — a race between red and blue. They — along with their allies in the media — will tell Kansas voters that any vote outside the two-party duopoly is a wasted vote. Republicans will accuse Orman of being a closet Democrat, while Democrats will say he is really a Republican.”

Sound familiar???

As we head into the 2018 election cycle, I am eagerly diving into A Declaration of Independents, looking forward to reading it with all of you and having the opportunity to talk with Greg.

Happy Reading!

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POLITICS for the PEOPLE BOOK CLUB

CONFERENCE CALL with GREG ORMAN

SUNDAY, APRIL 15th @ 7 PM EST

Reader’s Forum–Brenda Ratliff

Brenda Headshot

I couldn’t put down Kathy Edin’s compelling discussion of contemporary American poverty, $2 A Day, Living on Almost Nothing in America. I read the book almost nonstop over two evenings, and as I read I became more enraged with each story and description of the current plight of America’s cashless poor.

This is happening in one of the most successful countries in the world.  No one would question this if it happened in India, Africa or Central America. Our well-meaning liberals would express outrage that these countries could not take care of its citizens.  After all, isn’t America the land of endless opportunity? Unfortunately, it seems that endless opportunity comes with a high price for those living without the same means as those who have the wherewithal that comes from access, opportunity and stability to maintain a higher standard of living.

There is also currently, and for the past 20 or more years, no political will to even acknowledge this kind of poverty in our country where current politicians obsess over the middle class, (i.e. votes). Trump was quoted in today’s news as wanting to do 836ad-2-a-daysomething about the rampant corruption in America’s system of entitlements with no proof whatsoever that this is happening.  Kathy Edin’s book asserts repeatedly, that corruption does not exist in any significant way in our system of benefits for the poor.  However, once again, an opportunity to garner favor with a political base rears its ugly head as a campaign tactic for the next election by blaming the most vulnerable in our society.

I grew up poor in New York City in the 60’s and 70’s amidst a tremendous amount of family instability.   But I never felt that there was nothing that could be done.  We survived on the old system, Aid for Dependent Children, after my father, our sole support, sat down one day in a chair and died of undiagnosed heart disease. My mother was left with four children from 7 to 14 years of age at home. She was semi-literate having never completed high school and her chances of employment were close to non-existent.  Besides, what was she going to do with all of us?  She went on welfare and raised us. Even then, it was a Herculean task to try to keep us safe, healthy and on a good path.  However, I never felt that there wasn’t a place to turn to, even if we were treated like second class citizens in whatever office we landed.  With welfare money we paid the bills, paid the rent with assistance from section 8, we had three meals a day, and I thrived in school.  That is what the old-fashioned welfare system managed to accomplish.  We were not cheats.  Circumstances caused my mother, a poor black woman who was ill-equipped for skilled work, to fall on hard times, and to ask for help to make sure her children were safe, housed and fed.

Today’s America, has almost no safety net for the poor. It took very little money to stabilize my family.  We were fortunate to be able to capitalize on the political will of a very different time during a period of social motion that changed everything.  Now the political establishment does not talk about poverty, except to blame poor people for being poor. They, along with large parts of America, believe that if you’re poor, it’s because you didn’t try hard enough. But that American can-do spirit applies to those mired in poverty, as Edin talks about in her book, as much as it applies to the middle class.  The resourcefulness of some of the people described in Edin’s book is remarkable.  To make it though, sometimes people just need a hand up, even if that is also a handout.

If we are ever to address this issue meaningfully, caring Americans must become engaged in the political life of this country. We cannot strip away every entitlement that’s been enacted since the New Deal to deal with poverty.  Edin describes many common-sense solutions in her book. However, these will never become policy unless we hold every person we send to Washington or any local office accountable to our communities.  I would argue that we need to upend the political system altogether.  This is a tougher road.  Most of us just want to live our lives.  However, it is the more humane and ultimately more developmental solution to creating a society that cares for all its citizens.

 Brenda Ratliff is a senior communications consultant with more than twenty years’ experience in developing, executing and managing successful communications and marketing strategies in the public, private and nonprofit sectors.  She is a longtime political activist and philanthropist working to create afterschool programs for inner city youth.

 

Please Join the Politics for the People Conference Call

With Kathyrn Edin

We will be discussing:

$2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America

SUNDAY

December 3rd at 7 pm EST

Call In and Join the Conversation

641-715-3605 and passcode 767775#

Reader’s Forum–Lou Hinman

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In Ratf**ked, David Daley tells, in vivid and painful detail, how the Republican Party, planning for the reapportionment that would follow the 2010 census, hatched a plan that would give them a crucial edge in the state legislatures that would carry out the redistricting.  They were so successful that they were able to control the gerrymandering of enough congressional districts to create a very probable Republican congressional majority until the 2020 census.

Gerrymandering was not new.  Almost from the beginning of two-party politics in the United States, gerrymandering has been used by both parties to make particular districts uncompetitive (“safe,” that is, for one of the parties or the other).  What was new was the novel idea of targeting particular state legislatures, and well laid plans to get a very slim party majority in them in advance of redistricting.

It may well be that the Republicans violated the gentlemen’s agreement with the Democrats about how this game was supposed to be played.  However, I feel that Ratf**ked makes too much of the Machiavellian ruthlessness of the Republicans, and is correspondingly too soft on the Democrats.  To me, it defies belief that Democrats were just too innocent to know how bad the Republicans were, or that they simply got caught napping.

Here’s why.

The Democratic Party’s calling card is that they are “the party of the common man.”  But since their main allegiance is to the shared control of the political process, they are careful not to get too strong.  If they were to get too strong, a few embarrassing questions could be asked about why they are not more effective in serving “the common man.”  If those mean and nasty Republicans get too strong – well, what can you do, they just don’t play fair!  (For more on this neglected subject, be sure to read Indispensable Enemies by Walter Karp.)

Not getting too strong demands, above all, not mobilizing their base.  So for example, when the Tea Party was busy organizing “town meetings” to oppose Obamacare, you might have thought the Democratic Party would have organized a few of the 38 million people who had no health insurance into town meetings of their own.  Of course, they did nothing of the kind.  For the Democratic Party, the mobilization of it’s base is to be avoided like the plague, because they may not be able to control it.

Similarly, if the Democratic Party were to get into a brawl with the Republicans over gerrymandering, it would weaken the Democratic machine in at least two ways.  First, they might actually win!  This would put pressure on them to use their increased power on behalf of “the common people” they are supposed to represent.  Second, even if they didn’t win it would turn over the rock under which gerrymandering and other manipulations by the two political machines thrive – about which the less said the better!

Finally, the Democratic Party is plenty ruthless when it comes to attacking insurgents in their own party (ask Jesse Jackson and Bernie Sanders) or independents (ask Lenora Fulani).

Lou Hinman lives in New York City and is an activist with IndependentVoting.org and the New York City Independence Clubs.

Ratfucked book image

*Reminder*

Conference Call with David Daley

Author of RATF**KED

Sunday, June 4th at 7 pm EST

Call: 641-715-3605
Pass code: 767775#

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